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Majors

The International Affairs interdisciplinary curriculum exposes students to courses in various disciplines while also giving students flexibility to select the courses and disciplines that interest them most.

Click here to learn how to declare a major in International Affairs

The B.A. in International Affairs begins with a core set of 6 courses that are required for all majors. This multidisciplinary set of courses includes coursework from international affairs, political science, anthropology, economics, and history.

Students are also required to select regional analysis elective courses, at least two of which must be from one region. For example, students interested in Latin America could take a course on Latin American Politics and a course on Introduction to Latin American History. The third course could be in the same region (Latin America) or a different region. Regional options include Latin America, Asia, Middle East, Europe, Russia, and Africa.

To provide students with a comparative perspective of global issues, students are required to complement their regional specializations by taking global dynamics courses. Students can choose from a wide-range of global options in various disciplines.

For both regionals and globals, students can choose the disciplines that interest them. For example, if a student is very interested in history, he or she could select appropriate courses offered by the history department to fulfill the regionals and globals.

The final course required for the major in International Affairs is the Senior Capstone course, which is a senior research and writing seminar that integrates and assesses the knowledge and skills developed by students participating in the International Affairs curriculum, including both experiential and classroom-based components. Requires student self-reflection as well as new research, analysis, and writing, which culminate in a final paper and presentation.

International Affairs Majors must also complete an “International Semester” to gain international experience through either a traditional study abroad semester, two Dialogue of Civilizations summer programs, or an international co-op.

Students majoring in International Affairs will have an additional foreign language requirement beyond the requirements for the Bachelor of Arts. Students will be required to demonstrate language proficiency through intermediate level II (four semesters of foreign language).

 


 

Degree Requirements

Please select from the links below to learn about the program options for international affairs students. Here you will find details about degree requirements for our major, combined majors, and minors, including the new area studies concentrations that enhance our majors’ regional knowledge base.

Please click here to view learning outcomes.

Note that students may not create their own combined major with International Affairs and another program.

 

B.A. in International Affairs

 

Concentrations:

International Affairs Majors may choose to focus their studies and graduate with a degree in International Affairs and a Concentration in Middle East Studies, Asian Studies, African Studies, European Studies, or Latin American Studies. Please see below for the degree requirements for each Concentration.

There are some differences in programs for students pursuing concentrations. Instead of 3 regional analysis courses, students must take 4 regional analysis courses in the region of their concentration, and 2 global dynamics  courses, one of which must be POLS 1160: International Relations. Furthermore, students must complete their international experience in the region of their concentration, and complete the 4-semester language requirement in a relevant language (for example, Spanish or Portuguese for a Latin American concentration, Hebrew or Arabic for a Middle East concentration, and Chinese or Japanese for an Asian concentration).

If you are a student interested in pursuing a Concentration in International Affairs, please contact your academic and faculty advisors.

B.A. in International Affairs with a concentration in African Studies

B.A. in International Affairs with a concentration in Asian Studies

B.A. in International Affairs with a concentration in European Studies

B.A. in International Affairs with a concentration in Latin American Studies

B.A. in International Affairs with a concentration in Middle East Studies

 

Combined Majors:

Students who wish to take more than one major may pursue a combined major between International Affairs and one of the other programs below. A combined major differs from a double major in that the departments have eliminated some overlap between the majors, reducing the overall credit load but maintaining the academic rigor and learning objectives of both majors.

Please click here to view learning outcomes.

Note that students may not create their own combined major with International Affairs and another program.

 

B.A. in Environmental Studies and International Affairs

B.A. in Human Services and International Affairs

B.A. in International Affairs and Anthropology

B.A. in International Affairs and Economics

B.A. in International Affairs and Religious Studies

B.A. in Languages, Literatures, and Cultures and International Affairs

B.A. in Political Science and International Affairs

Current students can utilize their degree audit (available through myNEU) to track their requirements and progress in the curriculum.

Course Descriptions and Schedules

Visit the Registrar’s webpage to access the most current schedule of classes and course descriptions.

myNEU

Connecting to myNEU provides access to Northeastern University’s online community and portal, allowing you to view your unofficial transcript, degree audit, and learn more about the university.

Blackboard

Blackboard is a web-based software application that integrates online course materials with online communication tools. Many professors use this tool to distribute course material to students.

Learning Outcomes for IAF Degrees

B.A. in International Affairs
  1. Explain global affairs and international issues since the early 20th century through diverse and cross-disciplinary theories of: (1) Interstate relations: conflict, cooperation, hierarchies; (2) Civil society, transnational advocacy networks, global social movements; and (3) State-society relations: democracy, authoritarianism, inequalities, citizenship.
  2. Apply experiential education to the discipline by acquiring language proficiency, cultural competence, regional expertise, and practical knowledge through Dialogues of Civilization, co-ops, internships, and/or study abroad and be able to reflect on the experiential education and make connections to coursework.
  3. Develop research skills by writing a research paper that has: (1) posed research questions based on appropriate primary and secondary sources and; (2) applied and interpreted data to draw conclusions.
  4. Critically analyze and compare: (1) relevant texts and other media and; (2) evidence, arguments, and competing paradigms/theories.
  5. Challenge assumptions and values that underlie claims about international affairs (the interstate system, state-society relations, civil society, cultures and human rights, etc.).
B.A. in International Affairs and Anthropology
  1. Explain contemporary cultures within their international, transnational, and global contexts since the early 20th century, through diverse and cross-disciplinary theories of: (1) Interstate relations: conflict, cooperation, hierarchies; (2) Civil society, transnational advocacy networks, global social movements; and (3) State-society relations: democracy, authoritarianism, social justice and inequalities, citizenship.
  2. Apply experiential education to the disciplines by acquiring language proficiency, cross-cultural competence, area/regional expertise, and practical knowledge through Dialogues of Civilization, co-ops, internships, and/or study abroad and be able to reflect on the experiential education and make connections to coursework.
  3. Develop research skills by writing a research paper that has: (1) posed research questions based on appropriate primary and secondary sources and; (2) applied and interpreted data to draw conclusions.
  4. Critically analyze and compare: (1) relevant texts and other media and; (2) evidence, arguments, and competing paradigms/theories.
  5. Contextualize and challenge assumptions and values that underlie claims in central debates of anthropology and international affairs (the interstate system, state-society relations, civil society, cultures and human rights, etc.).
B.A. in International Affairs and Economics
  1. Explain global affairs and international issues since the early 20th century through diverse and cross-disciplinary theories of: (1) Interstate relations: conflict, cooperation, hierarchies; (2) Civil society, transnational advocacy networks, global social movements; (3) the intersection between politics and economics and; (4) State-society relations: democracy, authoritarianism, inequalities, citizenship.
  2. Apply experiential education to the discipline by acquiring language proficiency, cultural competence, regional expertise, and practical knowledge through Dialogues of Civilization, co-ops, internships, and/or study abroad and be able to reflect on the experiential education and make connections to coursework.
  3. Develop research skills by writing a research paper that has: (1) posed research questions based on appropriate primary and secondary sources; (2) located, collected, and analyzed relevant data to use as empirical evidence and; (3) offered specific policy proposals.
  4. Critically analyze and compare: (1) relevant texts and other media and; (2) evidence, arguments, and competing paradigms/theories.
  5. Challenge assumptions and values that underlie claims about international affairs and economics (the interstate system, the global economy, state-society relations, civil society, cultures and human rights, etc.).
B.A. in International Affairs and Religious Studies
  1. Explain the interaction of religious views with institutions and cultures in national and international contexts since the early 20th century, through diverse and cross-disciplinary theories of: (1) Interstate relations: conflict, cooperation, hierarchies; (2) Civil society, transnational advocacy networks, global social/religious movements and; (3) State-society relations: religion, democracy, authoritarianism, social justice and ethics, citizenship.
  2. Apply experiential education to the disciplines by acquiring language proficiency, cross-cultural competence, facility in informed empathy, regional expertise, and practical knowledge through Dialogues of Civilization, co-ops, internships, and/or study abroad and be able to reflect on the experiential education and make connections to coursework.
  3. Understand and be able to apply diverse methodological tools and develop research skills by writing a research paper that has: (1) posed research questions based on appropriate primary and secondary sources and; (2) applied and interpreted data to draw conclusions.
  4. Critically analyze and compare: (1) relevant texts and other media and; (2) evidence, arguments, and competing paradigms/theories; (3) diverse religious traditions.
  5. Challenge assumptions and values that underlie claims about religion and international affairs (the ethics and praxes arising through religions; the interstate system, state-society relations, civil society, cultures and human rights, etc.).